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Question: Travelling

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Ebonyrc90
Ebonyrc90's picture
Question: Travelling

So im assuming prisoners cannot immediately travel internationally as soon as they get out of prison, has anyone had a pp visit your country? :baffled:

Edited by: Ebonyrc90 on Dec 11 2017 - 8:23pm Reason: Imported from old database.
Silas Sydenham
Silas Sydenham's picture

Several ex-captives of the USA, and a couple from Uganda who remained my penfriends after release have visited me here in Australia. In order for them to do so, I have had to sign as guarantor for their behaviour whilst here. No big deal. Thousands of "ex-felons" visit Australia every year. A visitor's visa is easy. Permanent residence is very difficult. There are quite a few immigration lawyers over here who bill their clients only if there is a successful outcome.

Medusa03
Medusa03's picture

Several ex-captives of the USA, and a couple from Uganda who remained my penfriends after release have visited me here in Australia. In order for them to do so, I have had to sign as guarantor for their behaviour whilst here.

Wow, you took quite a risk.
Ex-felon or not, we can never fully control other people's actions.
I'm not sure I would even do that for some of my (extended) family's members let alone for pen pals.

Gipsy
Gipsy's picture

Well I'm not sure if the laws are the same in every state but I am guessing it is similar.
Usually, they cannot travel as long as they are on parole. That is because they won't get a passport.
But if the PO allows it, they can get a passport, and furthermore, if the PO allows it they can travel internationally. I guess that unless it is some urgen family issue or for work, the chances of getting an authorization while on parole is none.
Then there is also the matter that not all countries allows former prisoners to enter. Felons cannot travel to Canada for example. I think the laws for Australia are failry strict as well. But you should be able to check this out on your government homepage.

sjc
sjc's picture

When paroled in California, they are required to stay put for the first year.

PDS
PDS's picture

Years ago, I know, that in Texas, they have to get permission from their PO to leave the county they live or work in. That could've changed, but I hardly doubt it. Hopefully, I will get to find all this out very soon. My husband has had his interview with the IPO for his unit. He said it went really well. All we can do is wait for the Parole Board to make their decision.

Derpy
Derpy's picture

For visiting Denmark, they're required to have a passport and fulfilled their parole obligations - so it's not "right away", but I rather like the idea of showing a pen pal around the city :)

Zarchery
Zarchery's picture

Usually when they're paroled (as opposed to released after serving their full sentence), they can't even leave their state within the U.S. I imagine this can get really tricky in small states on the East coast. I grew up in Delaware, where you're never more than 35 miles from a state border.

Pretty sure that a prisoner that completes the full sentence has the same travel rights as a normal citizen.