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SimplyRae
SimplyRae

Hello everyone,

May I start by saying that these threads have been very informative.

I have a couple of questions that you may be able to help answer.
Does anyone know what happens upon release when an inmate is not from the state in which they are incarcerated?

I only ask cos my PP is incarcerated in SC and he is from Los Angeles, CA...polar opposites! Does he have to fund his trip back home himself or how does it work?

Secondly, I would like to know what the best way to spend the first 24 hours of release is? I know it sounds dumb, but I cannot even begin to comprehend the excited apprehension someone must feel when they are, for the first time in years, completely free. Choices we find every day must be mind boggling (what flavour ice-cream, what pair of trainers /sneakers to purchase) and I would like that day to be as smooth as possible for my PP when he gets released.
Also, does someone have to be there to meet them when they get out? If his family cannot make it from LA, dependent on how this progresses, I may have to be the one who is there on his release.

I'm sorry if these subjects have been covered already. Any advice would be very greatly appreciated.

Thanks

 
smiley
smiley

Hello everyone,

May I start by saying that these threads have been very informative.

I have a couple of questions that you may be able to help answer.
Does anyone know what happens upon release when an inmate is not from the state in which they are incarcerated?

I only ask cos my PP is incarcerated in SC and he is from Los Angeles, CA...polar opposites! Does he have to fund his trip back home himself or how does it work?

Secondly, I would like to know what the best way to spend the first 24 hours of release is? I know it sounds dumb, but I cannot even begin to comprehend the excited apprehension someone must feel when they are, for the first time in years, completely free. Choices we find every day must be mind boggling (what flavour ice-cream, what pair of trainers /sneakers to purchase) and I would like that day to be as smooth as possible for my PP when he gets released.
Also, does someone have to be there to meet them when they get out? If his family cannot make it from LA, dependent on how this progresses, I may have to be the one who is there on his release.

I'm sorry if these subjects have been covered already. Any advice would be very greatly appreciated.

Thanks

From what i understand, If he is released without parole, then he is free full stop, they open the gates and he walks out with his clothes maybe a few possessions, maybe a bus ticket and what ever is left on his books if he is lucky usually in a plastic bag/box. If he is not from that state, no one gives a sh!t in all honesty unless he has pre arranged something with his counselor, which is highly unlikely, but possible. Yes HE is responsible for any costs incurred going back "home" where ever that maybe, interstate or around the block.

No one has to meet them on there release, many people walk out alone. If he is attached to the parole board, then that's a new ball game. His place of residence has to be pre approved BEFORE release, he will be on a curfew, no visitors allowed to stay over, the places he is allowed to frequent are restricted and then you have a parole officer you need to deal with and much more.

As far as what he would like to do, often it depends on them and how long they have been in. Some shy away from crowds, noises and the traffic, others are happy to be amongst it all again. Even though they have been out of action, some deal with it better than others. What they do not need is pressure, go at their pace.

I picked someone up a very long time ago at midnight, he walked out the gates, kissed the ground and couldn't wait to get far away from that place as possible.....I still laugh at that memory......

 
YMIHere
YMIHere

@WestonFromFla and MoxieBravo: thanks for the info :thx: He does have a Probation Officer to report to when he is released so I'm guessing he'll have to stay in that state awhile, 'tis a pity as I'd guess he'd wanna get back to life as "normal" and is gonna need a lot of support which he can't get as readily in SC.

He may have to stay for a while, but he may also be able to go back home.

There is something called the "Interstate Compact" which has to do with inmates being moved from the jurisdiction from where they are supposed to serve probation sentences, etc.

I don't know TOO much about it - my husband still has AT LEAST 9 years to go, but I'm hoping that he won't have to do his probation in NY and that he'll be able to do it here in FL ultimately. If you google interstate compact you can probably get more info about helping your friend get back home.

 
SimplyRae
SimplyRae

@Christin1976 Bit of a puzzle, aint it? :) Never mind, we'll find out!

 
SimplyRae
SimplyRae

@WestonFromFla and MoxieBravo: thanks for the info :thx: He does have a Probation Officer to report to when he is released so I'm guessing he'll have to stay in that state awhile, 'tis a pity as I'd guess he'd wanna get back to life as "normal" and is gonna need a lot of support which he can't get as readily in SC.

 
MoxieBravo
MoxieBravo

They'll more than likely give him bus fare if no one is there to pick him up.

That other stuff, I have no idea. :)

 
WestonFromFla
WestonFromFla

I don't really know, but I'm sure it depends whether he has to serve probation or not, if he has to serve probation he has to stay in the state.

I read that they get gate money, which is usually around $200 and they either wait outside for a ride or get taken to a train or bus station. Not sure if that is the way it works in NC but my cousin got released from prison last year and that's what they did for him.

 
Christin Thereā€¦
Christin Theres Wellers

Hey SimplyRae
I cant help you I am afraid but I find this very interesting as my pp comes out next year and I have no idea either how that works. :)